The Horse and His Boy [Book Review]

The Horse and His Boy [Book Review]
Hello there!
Title: The Horse and His Boy (The Chronicles of Narnia
#3)
Author: C.S. Lewis
Publisher: Geoffrey Bles
Published Date: 1954
Rating: 3 Stars
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Synopsis: The Horse and his Boy is a stirring and dramatic fantasy story that finds a young boy named
Shasta on the run from his homeland with the talking horse, Bree. When the pair
discover a deadly plot by the Calormen people to conquer the land of Narnia,
the race is on to warn the inhabitants of the impending danger and to rescue
them all from certain death.
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Review: I was
eager to read this one after having enjoyed the previous book a lot. For some
reason I haven’t posted those reviews yet but have decided to post this one. I
know, I don’t understand my reasoning either. But oh well.
This story surprised me. It wasn’t even set in Narnia,
and featured an entirely different set of characters, which wasn’t what I was
expecting after having read and loved The
Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.
Different to all the action in the first
book, this one was more of a slow adventure. The pace was slow and steady.
Sometimes a little too much on the slow side for my liking, but it was all
bearable.
The difference in characters surprised me. I believed we
were going to be following the main four for the whole series, but apparently
not! Shasta was the main character in this story, and I found him to be okay. I
couldn’t love him or hate him. It wasn’t that he was unlikeable or anything –
he just wasn’t the best person either. Most of all, which made him seem very human, and I believe that is exactly what
C.S. Lewis was aiming to get at.
What intrigued me a lot about this book was the horse to
boy relationship. As is in the world of Narnia, the animals can speak and have
their own minds. The action of riding a horse changed, because of this. Shasta
had to ask permission to ride Bree, and treat Bree right. It would epic if all
animals could be like that. I bet mistreatment would disappear as well. It was
also interesting to see the human personality traits that Lewis gave the horses,
such as pride and nervousness. It was entertaining, but then I also felt a
little weird realising how much I was relating to a talking horse.
I was also surprised by the amount of slavery in the
novel. A lot of people seem to be slaves to others. I was more so surprised
because of how much of it was included, and that it is a children’s novel. I’m
not exactly sure why I was so unprepared for it, but there it was nonetheless.
It doesn’t get into a moral debate about it, but it’s just present in the novel
as numerous people have a slave status.
There was an appearance of the main four, and plenty of
mention of Narnia for all that I am complaining about it being absent. We get
to see Lucy, Edmund and Susan all grown up and ruling their kingdom, which was
shocking to see. It was so different, and yet also intriguing to see the
characters I had come to love through the eyes of someone else. It put a new
perspective on their position in the world Lewis has created.
The descriptions of the food were glorious. I was
practically drooling while reading about them. The landscape description was
impressive too.
Lastly, like with the previous book, we have the
character who represents God returning again in this short little novel. In
this scenario, He is presented in a different way, and brought a new
perspective on the way in which God fit into Shasta’s story. Even as a
Christian, there was one element to something which was a metaphor to religion
that I didn’t agree with. However, just like before, you could read this one
without looking at the Christian literature meaning behind it. Otherwise, it’s
just another Narnia story. You get to choose what you’re looking for in the
story.
It’ll definitely be on to the next one for me.
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Gif Summary:

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Links: Goodreads and Amazon!
Olivia’s Question: Do you like when series follow various
characters, all in the same world?

Olivia-Savannah x


17 thoughts on “The Horse and His Boy [Book Review]”

  • Hey Oliviah! I'm your friend Veronica the one who always says that A COURT of mist and fury is an erotica book that shouldn't be read by kids. I just came by to tell you:

    GREAT REVIEW!
    It's been a while since I dropped by here in your blog, but I visit from time to time and I thought I'd drop by and say hi so
    Hi!

  • This series is so lovely! One of the things I love about it is that instead of following a specific set of characters, the author focused more on the world's lifetime. If you remember the first book and the description of worlds as being pools it makes so much sense, you know? The pools are slowly built up by rain and after a while, they dry up as do worlds and this series chronicles the world's journey through life. Can you tell I'm in love with the concept?? 😀 I hope you continue to enjoy the rest of the series, Olivia!

    Laura @BlueEyeBooks

    • I love how much you love the series! It really is more about the world, which is a unique shift in having that as a focus of a series rather than the people. I don't quite remember that, but now that you mention it, it makes a lot of sense! What a unique concept…

  • I read this as a kid and remember loving it, but would I today? I don't know, I should re- read it! I do like the talking animals part of Lewis' world, and I'm curious about the food- I don't remember that.

    Glad you enjoyed it and hope your continuing reads are good too!

  • I read this one a long, long time ago. Reading your review makes me want to reread the series in order. I am sure there are a lot of things I don't remember. I have always felt a connection with horses and would have loved to have been able to talk to one. 😉 Great review!
    ~Jess

  • I don't think I've ever heard of this one. But I'm glad you enjoyed it. Though, a classic, I'm not so sure if it's the kind of thing I'll enjoy nowadays. 🙂

    Thanks for sharing, hun!

  • This is one of my childhood favourites! I never really read it from a Christian perspective, more from a perspective of… heart? Emotion? Beautiful-ness? I dunno. I've just always loved this one 🙂

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